Vision

5 Steps for Achieving Goals

It’s a brand new year!   Happy New Year!

And by now, one month has almost passed for 2018.

You’ve had time to work on some goals, and opportunities to do something different this year over these past few weeks.  Hopefully, you have taken steps in the right direction towards the changes you want to see!

But if you haven’t, it’s okay.  We have all been there. But, we don’t have to stay there!

I have learned a secret:  if nothing changes, nothing changes.

In other words, if we do not intentionally change something we do daily or weekly, the results we are receiving will not change.  If we do not change our routines or habits that could aid in accomplishing our goals, we will be standing at the end of the year wondering where did the time go?

Here are some things to ponder:

·      Time is going to continue to press forward.

·      Being busy is not an excuse.

·      It is not going to happen overnight.

I have learned from my own personal experience that if I want to achieve my goals for the year, then I need to create actionable steps and habits in my weekly schedule to give me the results I want to see!

“Discipline is the bridge between goals and accomplishment.” – Jim Rohn

Here are 5 steps for you to accomplish your goals:

1.  Decide what you want.

I know it may sound simple, but this practice is to help bring some clarity to your own soul.  What is it that you want to accomplish this year?

·      Do you want to go back to school?

·      Do you want to buy a home?

·      Do you want to try a new career?

·      Do you want to read more books?

·      Do you want to get into the best physical shape of your life?

·      Do you want more of God in your life?

Give yourself a fair chance to win.  You cannot hit a target that has not been identified.

2.  Write it down.

Right?  Again, another simple practice, but lots of people never take the time down to write down what they want to accomplish.

Did you know that people who write down their goals on paper (or digital format) are more than likely to accomplish their goals?  It’s true!  Great men and women have practiced writing down thoughts and ideas for hundreds of years.

Even the books and letters of the Bible are here today because the authors WROTE IT DOWN!

“When you write things down, they sometimes take you places you hadn’t planned.” – Melanie Benjamin

Pull out a sheet of paper.  Buy a journal.  Open your laptop.  Use the notes feature on your iPhone.  

3.  Share it with someone.

Okay, I know this makes you a bit vulnerable to others.  You are sharing things with someone that might be a bit personal.  But, I would encourage you to share your goals with someone you trust and someone that believes in you.  Also, if it’s really private, then use discretion.

The goal here is not to spread TMI (too much information), but to create a healthy accountability for you.  When others know what we desire to do or should be doing, it helps us to strive for the prize.

As long as you keep it private, you may not feel the healthy “pressure” to make it happen.  And here’s the bonus:  it’s not for them, but it’s for YOU!

4.  Schedule it into your calendar.

Let’s say you desire to read more books this year.  Okay, what books specifically?  And when you have selected your books, which book will you read first?  And once you have your first book, what part of the day or which days will you schedule some reading time?

I know – not all are scheduled people.  But the point here is to say that if it’s not on the schedule, it doesn’t exist.  If we don’t create space to achieve the habit required to meet the goal, we will not reach the goal.  Plain and simple.

You are worth it.  

You may not feel like those small changes in your daily routine are making a difference, but trust me, they do!  Small changes daily are magnified over time.

5.  Review periodically.

Now, here is where discipline really comes in – at the end of the month or every quarter, review your progress.

Personally, I check my personal and professional goals every month.  I want to know how I am doing.

Just like we check the scoreboard at football games to know who is winning, your year needs a scoreboard to know if you are down or up.  If you are down, make adjustments.  If you are up, keep doing what you are doing.  

You can either make progress or make excuses, but you cannot do both.

Now, get out there and go win!

Define Your Vision with Values

In recent decades, we have seen the emergence of books, seminars and conferences that bring secular leadership principles to the church setting.  Additionally, more and more civic and business leaders are becoming active in their local churches, exerting a corporate influence on church leadership.  This has undoubtedly been a blessing to the kingdom of God.  It has fostered a spirit of excellence and professionalism in the body of Christ that represents the kingdom well.

While secular leadership and church leadership share many sound ideas, they flow out of starkly different visions.  The jargon of each idea highlights opposite purposes: “gains” vs. “grace”, “success” vs. “salvations”, “profits” vs. “praise”, “losses” vs. “longsuffering” – you get the idea.  So, before we talk about vision, we need to talk about values.  Vision is what we do.  Values are who we are.  No matter how great the vision is or how clear we can communicate it, if we don’t embrace the correct values, then we cannot expect God to prosper our work. Here are a few virtues that should define your vision. 

Obedience. Jesus said, “If you love Me, keep My commandments” (John 14:15).  Obedience is not solely our duty to Him, it is also our expression of love for Him.  We must be people of God before doing the work of God.  Google “obedience” and you’ll find this definition: submission to another’s authority. Don't ever forget that!  We are under His command.  “Dreaming is free” is a catchy phrase, but we are not free to dream our own dream.  Our vision should center on God’s – “He does not want anyone to be destroyed, but wants everyone to repent (2 Peter 3:9)”.  Our pursuit is obedience, before results. 

Compassion.  In ministry, passion alone is not enough.  Visionaries see needs – and it compels them.  God pointed Moses to the captivity of Israel.  David came to an army overpowered by fear.  Esther saw a nation in exile.  Jesus paid the sins of a helpless humanity.  None of them were concerned with success or fame, it was compassion that drove them. 

Relationships.  Spiritual leadership requires more than solely responsibilities.  It requires relationships.  Jesus called the twelve, “disciples”, but eventually he called them “friends”.  In other words, you must love on the people you lead.  And those relationships should deepen over time.  Ministry doesn’t serve clients.  It serves God’s children.  

Authority.  Authority is not the same as power.  The Pharisees were inferior to Christ in power, yet they abused the little power they had.  Jesus on the other hand, had all the power in the world.  He could have demanded that people follow.  In fact, He could have forced them.  But what had people in awe of Christ was His authority.  “When Jesus had finished saying these things, the crowds were amazed at his teaching, for he taught with real authority—quite unlike their teachers of religious law.” Power usually gets results through fear.  Authority gets results through love.  In business, employees fear losing their jobs if they don’t submit to leadership.  In ministry, people love the benefits of following a godly leader.

How do you want to produce results?  Love overcomes fear.  The greatest commandment is love.  God is love.  Let your vision be defined by love.  Entrepreneur and inspirational speaker, Robert Clancy puts it this way, “Great leaders may be found at the top of the mountain looking back upon their challenges, but the greatest leaders are often found at the foot of the mountain still helping others reach the summit.”

- Pastor Chali 

Chali Martinez is passionate about spreading the transformational gospel of Jesus Christ.  His unique speaking style blends passion, humor, and clarity and has made Pastor Chali a highly solicited international speaker.  Having accepted the call to ministry at age 16, Chali now has over 20 years of ministerial experience having served as a singer, songwriter, evangelist, and youth pastor.  In 2013 Chali and his lovely wife Carla founded Vital Church in McAllen, Texas, now one of the fastest growing churches in South Texas and where they currently serve as lead pastors.  Chali and Carla are the proud parents of two young boys, Dante and Luca.